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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101 (some duplicates have been removed)
to paris before independence, a time of a new generation. >> they came here in order to improve themselves and to thereby improve their country. >> as for this generation of americans, america's favorite historian is less than enthusiastic. >> we are raising children in america today who by in large historically are ill it illiter. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm byron pitts. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you
to world war i. it was going to come through belgium along the channel coast, and down into paris. buddy had to completely rearrange that andy came up with the idea -- one of his generals -- to think through belgium but send the majority of his armored power through the ardennes forest further south and come further behind any french and british armies that went to belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10, 1940.s? and the british and the frenchv did what the germans expected. as soon as the germans when into belgium, the french and the british went out, the armored divisions came in behind, and forced really the cream of the french army and the british expeditionary force up to the port of dunkirk. that's what we know as the evacuation of dunkirk. speak before you go any further, when did the british come across the channel into france? >> i think they must have done this maybe even as early as 1938, but certainly after war in 1939 started. they put the british army next to the french in anticipation of the germans coming. of course, vineland through the
paris couture. eglin said this young man looking very serious as he sits -- you will see this young man looking very serious as he sits and you will realize this is not a miracle. there was a solid basis. the other thing i want to say is that, you know, they're not many designers are around here changed the course of history. because when it comes to fashion, yes, there are lots of things that we see. lots of excitement, lots of fralala going on, but we do not often see things that you realize have captured the moment in time. and that is what i think you'll find in this exhibition. but i do not want to talk anymore, because those are actually some of the believes that you have come to listen to jean paul gaultier and not suzy menkes. [laughter] so jean paul, i really wanted to ask you, thinking we're going through the exhibition from the beginning, the power you give women with the sexuality with the corsets, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is h
of paris but not to the streets that we know that are in front of the palace but the streets with a very mixed community. in those days, even more so. and that inspired you to do collections. this was in a way breaking a parisian code, wasn't it? instead of pretending these immigrants were not there, you're actually inspired by their colors, their hair, their clothes, and you turn them into your collection. >> definitely. i was very inspired by different people always. maybe -- with me, i felt a little different. a project at school. for example, not doing football. i was more touched by people that are a little different or could be rejected. they inspire me also because i do not know it was another world. for inspiration, for example, because close very clearly, very early became my attraction -- clothes became nmy attraction, a subsection. as more attractive to addressing people than addressing myself. it was not my objective desire, my own person. so i think that if i looked, the market inspire me. people different in it the streets or inspiring me. not what was fashion. maybe i was
advantage of a vacation to contact three systems in paris, and speak to representative who knew about those three systems. we then confirmd that interview in a phone call with some emails. >> great. >> so let's have jack come up because he can talk to you about the story of our interviews, why we conducted them and some of the information we got from those interviews. >> thank you. and as sharon mentioned when we do our interviews we have two people present and make records of them, so in doing so to continue we spent ten months of our subsequent investigations investigating the muni. during this time muni management continued to insist that using switchbacks as a traffic smoothing tool was good for the majority passengers, yet digging deeper the civil grand jury discovered in fact that the muni had no evidence one way or another about the use or abuse of switchbacks. this was because as many managers repeatedly told us switch backs are commonly and frequently used in other transportation systems around the world. according to one manager" they're part of transportation 101 and a bas
of the elegance of paris. and i remember that i propose -- it was the last new bid of coutoure that arrived. i thought to propose -- [unintelligible] why don't you take one designer like vivian westwood or others to make one season, one coutoure collection? >> you should call some up immediately and suggest the deal. >> [laughs] that is true. each one to make their own collection should not be back. a very attractive idea. >> as you do not want to talk about art, we will not say your work is art. let's be very vulgar and talk about money. [laughter] it is extraordinary what you have produced in coutoure. does that make any money? quick to be honest, what we produce in coutoure does not make money but it does include money. i must say, i am very proud of that. when i started to do coutoure, after a lot of stories that may be issued do another job, i said, ok, i will do my own collection. i started and never stopped after. on boat one, one woman, done all in lace in the exhibition. it starts like, ok, i did not think to make another one. so i did one after and one after and one after peter i am
and this hotel really reflects that. >> on to paris and christian lacroix known for famous designs. what will we find them. >> lacroix is known for couture, vivid colors like the magenta i'm wearing. this hotel dates back to the 17th century. instead of krcroissants, you'll find a blow-up in the room of wallpaper. there are some elements very contemporary, some very modern, but there is just a whimsical and fun. if you're going to paris and want to stay somewhere that doesn't feel cookie cutter, this is a good choice. in the november issue of travel magazine, we feature this area as kind of a buzzy place to go for shopping, eating and exploring. >> it's hard to be in paris and not be inspired to shop, anyway, and then you're surrounded by christian lacroix. how can you go wrong? >> i'm concerned about the credit card bill, but it's worth it. >> and then the dominican republic, and that would be a famous stomping ground of an oscar de la renta print? >> he has gone back and put his signature on a gorgeous hotel called ortega bay. this has 14 different villas. obviously he's popular for many red c
in paris. one day i said to him, "can you tell me something about color?" he says, "there's one thing i can tell you -- nobody understands color." i said, "fine, that's just the way it is with me." and that was the end of that problem. around 1958, '59, somewhere around there, i started a painting. it was 18 feet by about 9 or 10 feet, and i'd never done a painting that big. and then i realized i didn't have the space to come back to see my painting. it was too close, and i couldn't seem to get far enough away to see what i'm doing. then my feeling about how i see a painting changed. i realized every time i do something, if i have to run back to take a look at it, it's impossible. i can't paint that way. ah! ah! instead of looking, i had to feel it. ah! in order to feel it, to work with it, i had to carry that feeling. well, a little more, little more, little more. it really made the biggest difference in my life as far as painting goes. pat responds to something much more beautiful, much more rhythmic. i'm really not rhythmical or beautiful. i'm just like a different something. i fall. i-i
it is very conservative in paris. >> only you had come to san francisco. >> yes. >> i can only imagine what you would have produced. [applause] >> that is true. >> here is this good little boy who is be heading classically and is very charming and wonderful and working hard. how did you turn into a bad boy? [laughter] and tell us about the whole business of putting sexuality on the map, as it were. when you go into the exhibition here, it is still shocking to see some of the clothes which are suggesting a kind of pervert petit, never against women. you see a lot of flash and tattoos and in the clothing. it must've been completely taboo when you started doing the mine in 1970's and early 1980's. >> i think it was, yes. it was, to be honest, all the things i did that were supposed to be provocative or maybe that make me called a bad boy to the french, because some of the journalists saw that was making jokes and things like that, provocative things. it was not as a provocation. my goal is to be known, so i have to make them be seen this way. it was more because of my reflection and also what
regularly in london and paris. i am very happy to see that they are having this enthusiasm and interest in modernizing business, modernize and design. >> the lifestyle you are promoting is only available to a small group of very rich people. does that concern you? >> i am always ask, what do you think about promoting luxury in this expensive lifestyle? i always say that you can be stylish without buying expensive things. style is an identity on how you see yourself. in china, the model is very different. young girls today will probably be totally transformed in a month, because it is a sharply changing society. from my perspective, i do not give up on anyone. >> unusually for a publishing venture, they made a profit in the first year. there is no question that there is an appetite for the lifestyle it promotes. the challenge now is to nurture the creative talent within the country to satisfy that demand. >> that is it from beijing for now. i will be back at the same time tomorrow. of course, there is plenty of analysis on line about the once in a generation handover of power year. just
. michael finney will be back. he takes a trip to paris explaining how you can too. there he is in paris. >> those tl is more coming up at 6:00. >> checking night sky for shooting stars can be randy. >> yes. finding international space station can be an adventure. >> so easy. >> for more information on how to find
. more to the point, london out is tremendously diverse. paris is becoming in admitting that it is more a diversity, and there's a little line for me quite hidden away the says i'm very much a parisian or i'm interested in parisian women, but not quite sure that i ever met a parisian woman. what do you mean by that? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely
to show the video. we heard that paris hilton has been playing this youtube video as well, so thank you paris. >> great. i think i will check it out now. >> we are here to talk about the birth of the baby girl. she's the one with the little orange head and we are one of the most successful zoos for breeding them and langers do things like passing the infant around from female to female and spreads parenting responsibilities out and mom gets something to eat and not too tired and this gives the mom a break and helps the older sister develop parenting skills she will need in the future. we are proud of having this species here at the zoo and less than 2,000 in the wild and why this breeding effort is important. since she has been born the giants are doing well and will stay black and orange and come on out to the san francisco zoo. >> that is a great reference. >> would anyone like to make public comment on this item? seeing none public comment is closed. we are on item seven. >> good morning commissioners and general manager. i am marvin yee with the parks and rec department. the
shopping on the busiest day of the year. >>> and a little taste of paris here in the bay area. the two local museums where you will be able to see art pieces from the louvre museum. >>> welcome back to the ktvu channel 2 morning news. time now 4:53. the salvation army is in desperate need of turkeys. every night volunteers prepare and deliver 5,000 warm meals to needy people who are unable to leave their homes. but the organization says this year their freezers are empty. salvation army will be hosting a frozen turkey drive today. donations can be dropped off at 8:50 harrison's street. >>> walmart workers hope to paralyze sales during the kickoff of the holiday shopping season next week. they are planning a series of strikes at stores around the country with the help of the union representing other retail employees. now the union says there will be 1,000 events including worker walkouts, flash mobs, and educating shoppers about working conditions. walmart has referred to the strikes as quote publicity stunts. >>> it's a bittersweet day for twilight fans as the last installment of the m
israel and the security council. >> you're in paris right now. what do you see the world reaction continuing to be? you talk about these missiles from iran. at what point does everyone gang up on israel? >> i think we're getting close to that point. in europe, if you also to the brock broadcasters, they see no difference between the terrorist use of missiles by hamas aimed at civilians and israel exercising a right of self-defense on the other. it's one side attacks then the other side responds with no differentiation. hamas has a advantage. israelis would like to get this resolved without going after the sources of the rockets, those that are are launched from the gaza strip, those that are manufactured in the gaza strip but they may have no alternative. if the united states were rocketed by a hostile power, i don't think we would let our civilian population live under those circumstances. we would retaliate, which is exactly what the israelis are doing. >> you talk about the sources of the weapons, the missiles come from iran, they're manufactured in iran, they have a 47-mile ra
. >> they have hip hop in paris, just so you know. >> but it's in french, yes, but it's a different kind of music. >> it sounds like it would be a stronger business plan if you honed in on that audience and that demographic group and see what they want, how many nights are you going to be able to get that crowd out versus a variety of facts. >> the scariest thing about this business is you invest all this money, you open up the business, you do the best you can, you comply with all the regulations and all of a sudden you're not making the rent and that's very scary, or you're not able to pay your staff because you didn't pull in enough money and then you fall off the proverbial cliff and start doing things that end up creating a problem venue. >> [inaudible]. >> well, i don't condemn any musical style, but i will tell you that i think when i said you need a plan b, you really flexed -- need to hone your marketing plan, if this doesn't work, how easily can i flip to that, how much of my income will be the food, the cocktails, the admission, you have so work with it. >> i appreciate that and we ha
will be flown to labs in paris, geneva, and moscow for testing. >> palestinian officials say they would petition the international criminal court if the investigation in the yielded prove that arafat was poisoned -- yielded proof that arafat was poisoned. >> after the sample was taken, the tomb was resealed. palestinian officials paid respects while an honor guard stood outside the mausoleum. a panel of experts at about their work behind blue drapes, taking tissue samples from the body of the former palestinian president, who died eight years ago in paris. his death has been the subject of rumors and conspiracy theories ever since. over the summer, his widow had his clothing examine, revealing traces of highly poisonous polonium 210. she filed charges for murder. most palestinians take it as a given that israel is responsible. for them, the only question is which poison was used. >> i am sending a question to all the world to help us determine the truth in the killing of yasir arafat. i hope that exhuming yasser arafat's body today will reveal the truth, and we will know the circumstances of the
by 0.5%, and the cac 40 in paris gaining 0.4%. earlier, asian stock prices were mostly lower on thursday following an overnight tumble in the u.s. sentiment was weighed down heavily as investors anticipate a fiscal cliff in the u.s. tokyo's nikkei average ended 1.5% lower, extending losses to four days. south korea's kospi lost 1.1%. hong kong shares were down 2.4%. looking at currencies, the yen is keeping a firm tone against the dollar and euro. traders are buying safer currencies like the yen due to a cautious outlook for the global economy. the dollar/yen right now 79.81 po 85. the dollar is also lower against the yen, currently 101.75 to 75. many market players are on the sidelines ahead of a european bank central policy meeting later today. >>> some key japanese economic indicators came out on thursday. they all show signs of a slowdown in business activities. the current account surplus for september shrank for first time in two months. this is a broad measure of foreign trade. finance ministry officials say the account surplus stood at $6.3 billion. that's down about
a look at the major benchmarks in europe. london's ftse 100 is down by 1%. in paris the cac 40 is down by .30%. that's all now in business news. i'll leave you now with a recap of market figures. >>> clear skies in tokyo but rough weather up north. rachel ferguson has more. rachel. >> hi. we've been following a storm moving through western and northern japan. we've been seeing heavy rainfall. we could get another 80 to 100 millimeters of rain in the next 24 hours. some strong winds with that too. gusts of 90 kilometers an hour have been recorded. there was even a tornado in wakaima. we don't see them so frequently in japan, but they're certainly not completely out of the question when we have a storm like this. there's one that came down over water. quite a tight funnel cloud earlier on in the day. so these kinds of conditions are going to persist on into thursday and it should start to clear up a little bit after that. meanwhile, the continent is looking very dry. that's also going to change. we have a rain event starting to develop in central china and it will move up to the northeas
almost 0.5%, and the cac 40 in paris declining by 0.5%. meanwhile, share prices across the asian europe was lower everywhere but japan because of the expectations to reach an agreement before the fiscal cliff fades. the kospi shed 1.2%. chinese stocks extended losses after the closely watched announcement of the new leadership in the country. the shanghai composite fell 1.2%. hong kong's hang seng slipped 1.5%. let's take a look at currencies. the yen fell to its lowest level in more than six months against the dollar. the dollar/yen 81.14-18. investors feel japan's general election next month may bring in a government that will carry out more monetary easing. the euro is recovering to the 103-yen level, now at 103.58 to 61. >>> representatives from japan's farming sector rallied in tokyo. they're urging the government not to take part in talks on a free trade deal under the trans-pacific partnership. japan has been in talks with countries involved in the u.s.-led trade negotiations. about 1,500 people gathered at the rally sponsored by the central union of agricultural cooperatives. >>
and it is okay. it is cleaner than paris. >> you are originally from paris? >> no. talose. it is cleaner than paris and talose. >> oh, hola. >> spanish. >> exactly. >> what is something else you have seen in this otherwise dirty city some. >> subways. >> what was the bad thing on the subway? >> you have a lot of homeless people living on the subway. >> that's where i live. >> locals or tourists, who is more messy? >> locals maybe. >> trick question, are you yourself from new york? >> originally. >> you were born here 1234 purell 1234* nice to meet you. where are you from? >> germany. >> germans are very clean, i know that. >> can you hold this for a second? >> carl cameron, fox news. >> nice to meet you. >> do you think the new yorkers litter? they will clock you with a two by 4. >> is this a joke? >> nothing joking. thanks so much. stay clean. what do you think is the dirtiest and loudest city? topeka? >> philadelphia. >> here is the thing about new yorkers, everybody hates philly. that is universal. even people in philadelphia hate phily. new york was voted the most stylish city in america.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101 (some duplicates have been removed)

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